Jane Kelly
freshly thrown pots
Penicuik Pottery

JANE KELLY, POTTER

 

Jane Kelly: Penicuik Pottery at Valleyfield House

off 17 High Street Penicuik EH26 8HS

 

RAKU, SMOKE FIRING & THE WYCH ELM PROJECT

South Bridge raku firing by Jane Kelly
one of the Scottish Potters
Penicuik Pottery, Valleyfield House High Street Penicuik EH26 8HS
01968 677854   South Bridge raku firing by Jane Kelly
one of the Scottish Potters
Penicuik Pottery, Valleyfield House High Street Penicuik EH26 8HS
01968 677854

 

  smoke firing at Penicuik Pottery Scotland
Valleyfield House High Street Penicuik EH26 8HS
01968 677854

 

 

 

smoke firing by Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery Scotland
one of the Scottish Potters
Valleyfield House High Street Penicuik EH26 8HS
01968 677854   smoke firing by Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery Scotland
one of the Scottish Potters
Valleyfield House High Street Penicuik EH26 8HS
01968 677854

previous raku and smoke firings

 

RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowls 19 & 20
from images by RBGE/Lynsey Wilson inset Stephanie Smith

        Image RGBE/Lynsey Wilson                            Inset image Stephanie Smith   

Jane Kelly, potter

 

Raised in New Zealand and London, I trained as a potter at Wimbledon, Norwich and Medway Colleges of Art under Tony Gant, David White, Colin Metcalfe, Peter Phillips, Siddig el Ngoumi and others. Within a few years of moving north to Portobello with my growing Scots family, I established a studio pottery in the centre of Penicuik.

 

 In Edinburgh in the mid seventies I first set up pottery classes for adults at Cannonball House and taught there and at Infirmary Street for thirty years; I also teach regularly from my Penicuik pottery, at the Garvald community, and at a school in Edinburgh.  But in many schools and art colleges the teaching of pottery has been brought to an end.  All over the British Isles indigenous pottery manufacture becomes harder and harder to find.

 

Enthusiasm among lovers of craft pottery is strong in Scotland and New Zealand.  With annual summer schools and occasional special pottery events at my Valleyfield House studio in Penicuik, I also exhibit each November at Penicuik Arts Centre and have shown with Scottish Potters at Aberdeen, Banchory, Broughton, Dunfermline, Glasgow, Nairn, Stirling, Perth and Milngavie.

This October I organize a joint show of work of potters and basketmakers at The Bield Gallery, Blackruthven, by Perth.

 

I concentrate on thrown pots: useful wares like jugs, teapots, mugs, cups, plates and bowls, saltshakers and butterdishes.  I have worked with Dalhousie Castle Hotel and the Traverse Theatre, now with the Royal Botanic Garden’s Wych Elm Project.   I am contributing a set of tea bowls to the Wych Elm Project using the Raku pottery technique, plunging the fiery pots into sawdust from the wych elm wood.

 

The Raku firing method originated nearly 500 years ago in Japan.  The name Raku first appeared later - in the sixteenth century - and roughly translated means contentment.   Raku is still used among tea masters during the Zen tea ceremony.  Western introduction to Raku began in earnest in 1911 with the English potter Bernard Leach who had participated in the tea ceremony in Tokyo.  An American, Paul Soldner in the 1960s added quality to the glaze effects by smoking the pots, and developed clays that would withstand the technique’s characteristic thermal shock.  The Raku process involves first applying a special glaze to a bisque (once fired) pot or ceramic piece, usually by brushing, pouring or dipping.  The piece is then fired to a temperature around 900 degrees Centigrade.  When the kiln has reached this temperature and the glazes have matured, the fuel supply is shut off.  The kiln is opened and the red-hot pieces removed with tongs or heavy-duty gloves. Traditionally, these glowing pots were either air cooled or dipped into a container of water. A more contemporary approach involves placing the hot pots into an enclosed container filled with combustible materials such as sawdust, or leaves. The container is then tightly covered which reduces the oxygen. This causes the combustibles to smoke heavily. Smoke penetrates clay and glaze, turning bare clay black and creating exciting metallic flashes or crackles on the glazes. For instance, a copper glaze can turn from green to golden lustre or red. After smoking for 10 minutes to several hours, the pieces are taken out, quenched in water to halt the reducing process, scrubbed clean, inspected and appreciated.

 

For the Wych Elm Project I am plunging the fiery pots into sawdust left by the furniture makers from the Botanic Gardens wych elm wood.  Each Raku piece is unique. The firing  -in the open air-  is adventurous and surprising. When the technique is unfamiliar several people are needed for safety so the firing is usually sociable and enjoyable.  For this project though I have found myself mostly working alone.  What I love about Raku pottery is the magic of the changing colours of the clay and the glazes in the firing.  It is quite impossible to make two pieces exactly the same. I also like the simplicity of the firing which needs the minimum of space and time.  Although it has a poor reputation as firewood I was confident about using elm in Raku.   We use elm in the house for banking up the fire at night, it burns slowly yet steadily. Elm is a tolerant tree which will grow in most soils and conditions.

 

I like to make useful pots from different clays.  In my studio in Penicuik you’ll find many different materials from locally dug stony earth to specialist porcelain. I keep learning and experimenting because I think at heart I am an alchemist, trying to transform the most basic elements around us into something of lasting use and beauty.

Jane Kelly potter
Penicuik pottery
from image of Jane Kelly raku pottery by Stephanie SmithJane Kelly potter
Penicuik pottery
from image of Jane Kelly raku pottery by Stephanie Smith

above from images of Jane Kelly by Stephanie Smith   

raku firing by Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery Scotland
one of the Scottish Potters
Valleyfield House High Street Penicuik EH26 8HS
01968 677854   Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery Scotland
one of the Scottish Potters
Valleyfield House High Street Penicuik EH26 8HS
01968 677854 

reduced from full size Amy Copeman photography
www.aimhighphoto.co.uk

                                                              image of Jane Kelly by Amy Copeman

RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowls

20 raku tea bowls were made by Jane Kelly and glazed with wych elm shavings for the RBGE Wych Elm project

 

RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowl 1

1

RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowl 2

RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowl 3

RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowl 4

RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowl 5

RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowl 6

RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowl 7

RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowl 8

RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowl 9

RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowl 10

RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowl 11

RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowl 12

RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowl 13
  

RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowl 14

RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowl 15RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowl 16RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowl 17RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowl 18

RBGE Wych Elm project Edinburgh 2009
Jane Kelly Penicuik Pottery
raku tea bowls 19 & 20
from images by RBGE/Lynsey Wilson inset Stephanie Smith

19(white) & 20(blue/gold) are illustrated in RBGE Wych Elm exhibition companion book

 

 

 

 

RECENT TEAPOTS BY JANE KELLY

TEAPOTS   MARINERS TEAPOTS   PENICUIK JUGS

PENICUIK PLATES & ASHETS  DALHOUSIE DISHES

BOWLS    BUTTERDISHES AND SALTSHAKERS

 

THROWING A POT AT PENICUIK POTTERY

 

Penicuik Pottery Summer Schools details pictures

 

Jane Kelly: Penicuik Pottery

Out of the Fire 2008 Stirling exhibition illustrated catalogue

Pots & baskets at The Bield, Blackruthven, Tibbermore, near Perth October 2009

 

 

  CARTHAGE MUST BE DESTROYED BEAKERS & JUGS

     RAKU for the BOTANIC GARDENS WYCH ELM PROJECT

   SCOTTISH POTTERS & BASKETMAKERS TOGETHER

   LAUNCHING THE NESS YAWL JEANIE HENDERSON

     PUTTING UP A WYCH ELM PROJECT YURT

 

 

Penicuik Pottery is open 10-12am Saturdays or by appointment

through the pend and down the drive at 17 High Street, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 8HS 

tel: 01968 677854  email: penicuikpottery@gmail.com

 

JANE KELLY, POTTER

 

Jane Kelly
bird teapots
Penicuik Pottery

 

Jane Kelly
blue jug
Penicuik Pottery

 

RECENT TEAPOTS BY JANE KELLY

 

 

   POTTERY MAKERS   MAKERS HOME   PENICUIK MAKERS

 

PENICUIK HOME   KOSMOID HOME

 

Campaign to revive the SCOTTISH CRAFT CENTRE

 

Next one up

NUMBER 87of the 200
 most visited KOSMOID& MAKERSwebpages

Next one down